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New to Muzzleloading (Read 3753 times)
Reply #15 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 12:11am

Mainspring   Offline
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Derbyshire.

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I personaly would not try leaving a large gap between Powder and projectile.I have never read up on any experiments to that effect but I follow well laid down rules by those who have gone before me during the Era when BP was the only propelent.I would be interested to see any reports of experiments on the subject.
 
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Reply #16 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 9:45am

FBoulton   Offline
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It depends on what you mean by a large gap. When loading BP cartridges, many of us use air as a filler. The general rule seems to be that if the case is more than 2/3 full than all will be well. Too much air and combustion becomes erratic.
Fred
 
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Reply #17 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 12:07pm

Mainspring   Offline
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Derbyshire.

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I load my BP Cartridges with a wad and cards that seat on the powder leaving enough for the shot overpowder card and roll turnover.This fills my cases to the 21/2" that my guns require.If I was advising a new to Muzzleloading shooter I would advise him/her to that effect.But I am interested to learn of the air gap that aparently has no adverse effect.
 
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Reply #18 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 1:05pm

paulab   Offline
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I personally examined an Italian repro Springfield in .58 cal. that had a nicely bulged barrel from firing off a bullet that wasn't fully seated. No air space for me!  cheers   Paul
 
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Reply #19 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 1:19pm

Feltwad   Online
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This thread  was started by a Tom Gray who was keen to learn about muzzle loading ,there will also be other members who are new to the sport Some of the replies I feel are getting away from the point for which some new  to muzzle loading may try too copy and may have serious consequences. I am enclosing a couple of images which I have witnessed with injury too myself
Feltwad
A burst barrel caused by a wad not ramed home but left on the barrel wall
...
Loading from the flask which was full and left me badly burnt down the right side of my body and face
...
 
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Reply #20 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 3:34pm

Mainspring   Offline
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Derbyshire.

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I was new to shooting in 1975.My first gun was a Navy Arms s/s Muzzle Loader.I was fortunate to join a bunch of blokes who where well experienced in this field.Since then i have had all sorts of Guns and Rifles both Nitro and Black Powder.having built a few for myself along the way.It is a good idea to watch and learn rather than go it alone until you are experienced enough.I enjoy BP shooting more than any other form and still pick up valuable wrinkles from contributors to this Forum.Feltwads Photos are right to the point.
 
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Reply #21 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 7:47pm

Graysmoke   Offline
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Sittingbourne, Kent

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Hey all,

Thank you all for the replies, its interesting just to see what comes up here. Thank you for the photos Feltwad, they put into perspective that this can be a dangerous sport if practices are done incorrectly. I understand how the principle of airspace  between powder and wads and shot can be dangerous, you only have to delve into the physics of the whole contraption to realise how it is a problem. I also understand that a common routine should be carried out each time you load the gun, to ensure such things never happen.

I think you'd all like to know that I have fired the gun now, I put about ten shots through it on Monday, although my dad was too scared to try Tongue And it performed very well, sounded just like my normal side by side shotgun, but the pattern was well spread, (I fired at an old fridge at about 15 yards with size 6 shot), I think this may be due to the fact that I only used a cushion wad between powder and shot, any thoughts on that? I used about 2 drams of powder aswell to start (Black powder equivalent from the 777 FFG I have, so about 38 grains of 777) , would I have a better spread if I up the powder to 2.75 - 3 Drams (BP Equivalent)? I was thinking this would get the shot moving faster, and in a more straight

Thanks very much for all the info so far, you've all been a great help!  Smiley

- Tom
 

T. Gray
UG - Electronic Eng
University Of Surrey
tg00067@surrey.ac.uk
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Reply #22 - 27th Mar, 2013 at 8:26pm

Graysmoke   Offline
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Sittingbourne, Kent

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And to bruno22rf, I would be very grateful for the powder, Smiley certainly does the trick for my gun. I would probably make a trip up from Guildford to collect it.
 

T. Gray
UG - Electronic Eng
University Of Surrey
tg00067@surrey.ac.uk
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Reply #23 - 29th Mar, 2013 at 1:22am

bruno22rf   Offline
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Its all yours Graysmoke-for some reason I cannot pm you but you can contact me -zigzag4me@hotmail.co.uk-regards chris
 
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Reply #24 - 29th Mar, 2013 at 1:43pm

paulab   Offline
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Gray....Those pictures are worth a thousand words aren't they? Over here in the colonies, there is an old saying......"less powder more lead, shoots far, kills dead". Believe it or not, you will have to pattern your gun with different combinations of wads, thicknesses, more or less powder and shot etc. to get the right combination that patterns well. I limit myself to 25 yards with my open choked .62 and 10 bore. Any farther and patterns open up too much to take game reliably. Google up "muzzleloading shotguns". Lots of good info there. cheers   Paul
 
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Reply #25 - 7th Apr, 2013 at 9:35pm

DEVA   Online
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mid uk

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Tom Grey ,following on Paulabs quote ,another old addage reads :-"That if you would the birds fall dead-Ram the Powder not the lead"..  DEVA
 

DEVA
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